Pages

Wednesday, 14 March 2012

TGO Challenge 2012: Route overview & Route sheet

I have been playing around with some new mapping software. More on the software itself at a later date, but it allows some simple to grasp features that show a little of the character of the route.

TGO Routebuddy Overview Map

(CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE)

You can see the lumpy bits at a glance: Not including tops, in order, there’s a Corbett, a Graham, two Munros, a Corbett, five Munros and a Graham.

Our route sheet looks like this:

Microsoft Word - TGOC 2012 Routesheet Alan Sloman Andy Walker Dave Wilkinson REV A.doc

Microsoft Word - TGOC 2012 Routesheet Alan Sloman Andy Walker Dave Wilkinson REV A.doc

(CLICK ROUTE-SHEETS TO ENLARGE)

You can see that there’s quite a bit of work to do prepare your route to the Vetter’s satisfaction but it’s all good fun and ensures that you have a good grasp on what you have in store.

The first real chance of resupply is at Spean Bridge, four days into the walk. From what I can gather from the web, Calvine & Struan don’t have any shops, so the next place for picking up stuff is Braemar, after another four Munros and a Corbett and five days later. There will be quite a bit of food carried this year: Oh deep joy!

Update! WeeWillyWilky has bought his walking boots, so he might just have them broken-in in time; There’s just eight weeks to go now…

22 comments:

  1. Now I understand why you won the best route award in 2010 (when I was there). Your secret is out. Expect a little bit more competition next year when Rye and I submit out joint entry. It will be comedy central.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Philip!
      How the devil are you?
      :-)
      No. We didn't win that year - but we were one of eight runners-up. Young Mr Banfield deservedly won with a magnificent job!

      So! "Fenboy" Rye and the Colonial as a team, eh? That'll make for a fascinating team! I'm looking forward to the write-ups already!

      Delete
    2. Listen up old boy. It will rain and the wind will blow. You know that, and also know you'll be low more than planned. I reckon your got this big old high level route in to impress old Grumps and co. Convince them you still got it. Well young Andy might have, but your exile from the east, and being 2ft above sea level has gone to your head. Two Munros in a day?. At your age?.

      Got to dash as I just witnessed a pig fly by the window ;-)

      BTW me and Phil will be a team and we might have a secret entry to give us a advantage as well.

      Delete
    3. Ah. I have been assured that this year the weather will be balmy. Warm sunshine on my shoulders and cooling breezes on the tops. The bogs will be crunchy dry and the streams will taste of lemonade ice-cream sodas.

      Any breezes will be from behind to aid the ascents, and the Fife Arms will be serving Real Ales with welcoming bar-staff.

      Then I woke up. It had all been a dream...

      Cheeky pup! I'll have you know I've knocked off three Munros in a day before now on the Chally! With age comes low cunning. Mad'n'BadAndy will be carrying the beers. WeeWillyWilkison will probably be carrying a limp, what with the new boots and all...
      :-)

      Delete
  2. I might copy that route - save me planning my own. ;-)

    Make sure you oil your knees Alan, they'll be squeaking by the time you reach the East Coast if not.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This might be a little too much information, but every possible moving part receives liberal doses of lubrication each morning on the Chally!
      The inner man receives its lubrication in the form of Sloe Gin and Leapfrog every evening. Should the knees complain during the day, more Leapfrog is applied.

      Delete
  3. An interesting and imaginative route I must say!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very sweet of you to say so, Gibson.
      After I had planned the first ten Challenges, I thought I would start to struggle with finding new routes. Then I 'got real,' realising that the chunk of Scotland in the Challenge area is huge and there are zillions of permutations.

      In fact, doing exactly the same route in different years would make for two completely different experiences as the weather plays such a significant part of the day!

      Designing a "through-route" is so much more liberating than the usual out and back affair.

      Delete
  4. Two lifetimes wouldn't be enough to explore Scotland and I agree "through-routes" are particularly satisfying - no - 'liberating' is the right word.

    Scotland and weather - say no more!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I met a chap on the Challenge, quite a few years ago now, in 2002, who was starting at Glenelg with me & Mick Coady. He was heading off in an unusual direction and I asked him why. His reply floored me at the time, but now I can fully understand.
      He had started every Challenge at Glenelg as he loved the place and was trying to get to know the area. I believe that this was his fifth Challenge. He was eventually heading off WEST into Knoydart before turning around and heading east after three days...

      Delete
  5. A masterpiece there Al. Looks a tough start.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The first three days are tough, purely for the terrain. That's why the mileages are shorter and also for the fact that we'll be carrying quite a bit of food and still be in Slack Southerner mode. We'll be starting early and finishing quite late on those days, I am sure!
      We certainly won't be rushing it. The west of Scotland is glorious country. Far too good to rush!

      Delete
  6. Gad and blast sir, I have been duped!

    You told me it was
    'a gentle stroll along country lanes and meandering rivers' because it was Dave's first and one should do a gentle one on your your first.
    But now if my eyes do not deceive there appear to be brown squiggly lines involved and there are lots of them and they appear to be in rather close proximity.
    As you well know, we have them about every second or third mile down here, and I am not acclimatised.
    Last year I got altitude sickness on the Sleeper.

    Good God man, I'll be having nose bleeds half way through Day 2.

    Luckily I have extra Sloe Gin on the go this year, but you may have to carry some of it. (tough life).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't fret, Sir. You won't see a single squiggly line when we get to Scotland. I have never seen one on the ground, have you?

      Besides, by the time we get there, Scotland will be considerably lower, what with the erosion: All the wind & rain will have flattened the hills quite a bit by then.

      I had better look after a daily ration of the sloe gin, in case we get separated.

      Delete
    2. Just so long as that wind and rain isn't passing through the week before you start. That's our first week!

      Delete
    3. I hope you don't mind me wishing you a little rain, just to freshen the burns up for us... not too much, mind... How about just at night?
      :-)

      Delete
    4. OK it's a deal. But the light rain must fall at night as suggested and cease in time for the tent to be dry before breakfast. And the day must then be of blue skies and fluffy clouds.

      This arrangement will remain our little secret. However, I'll be blogging all the way and if said arrangement is not honoured, I shall name you thus exposing you as a cad sir!

      Delete
    5. I'll brace myself for the onslaught, then...
      :-)

      Delete
  7. It seems you like teasing us who have no chance whatsoever to visit Scotland in the near future, Alan :) First the lovely 3 D maps, now this! But I do hope that they are not going to shrink Scotland nor iron it flat (or cover it totally with windmills...) before it's my turn!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A few escalators would be handy as well - just on the 'up' slopes in the direction we will be travelling.
      Flattening Scotland would definitely be a case of "Extreme Ironing"

      Delete
  8. I thought Scotland was rising up Al, (The land not he Picts).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah - the old Eustatic Rebound. Perhaps Wee Alex is on to something; With England sinking fast and Scotland rising he will have all the land and we will English will be a few feet under water...
      See HERE for details.

      Delete

Hi.
Because of spammers, I moderate all comments, so don't worry if your comment seems to have disappeared; It has been sent to me for approval. As soon as I see it, I'll deal with it straight away.
Thank you!