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Wednesday, 13 August 2014

A Wasdale slackpack: Part 3: Mountains

Everyone remembers their first visit to the Lake District, and especially so for Wasdale. The journey up the valley alongside Wastwater with Great Gable dominating, the screes, Yewbarrow and Scafell. The tiny road, threading its way between huge boulders polished to a shine thousands of years ago by giant glaciers. Shut your eyes and your skull cinema snaps into life and you relive the experience.

But it’s not just about the mountains; Its the weather ~ dark scudding clouds trapping you in the belly of the place, it’s about how man has domesticated the valley bottom, and it’s about the birds & insects that thrive hereabouts. And it is all set in the fabulous frame of incomparable mountain architecture.

Here are a few pictures of Wasdale’s architectural framework. You can click on them to make them bigger.

TOWARDS STY HEAD

TOWARDS STY HEAD

 

MOSEDALE

MOSEDALE

 

WASDALE HEAD & KIRK FELL

WASDALE HEAD & KIRK FELL

 

SHAPELY SCA FELL

SHAPELY SCA FELL

 

BOWDERDALE & NETHER BECK

BOWDERDALE & NETHER BECK

 

LINGMELL & GREAT GABLE

LINGMELL & GREAT GABLE

26 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. He's a grand lad, and he did all the driving.
      He needs an airing, once in a while.
      :-)

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  2. Replies
    1. Thanks, Mark
      With a short trip you can only take what's there whilst you're there (That sounds garbled, doesn't it - but I know what I mean even if everyone else doesn't!) and I only carry a small compact camera.

      Delete
  3. Nice photies Alan. My "skull cinema" was working just as I was reading those words!

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    Replies
    1. :-)
      Cheers, Sandy.
      I nicked "skull cinema" from John Hillaby's "Journey through Britain" - his account of his LEJOG in the sixties. It kept him sane, whole reels of film, writing letters to Local Authorities complaining about the state of the footpaths (they were bad then too!) and taking on mighty institutions and winning each time.
      I stroll along many a day and whole films are acted out in my noggin.

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  4. The Lake District seems to be magical and seemingly very large area. I will have to give it some serious thought to visit- thanks for the great photos Alan

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    Replies
    1. If you have the time before your Challenge next year the Lake District would make a great stopping off point for a few days for a gentle explore while you get used to the time difference.
      :-)

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  5. Your description captures the atmosphere of the place well Alan. The pics are good too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Gibson.
      :-)
      It's much more fun writing posts like this rather than long despairing treatises on Scottish wind farms.

      Delete
  6. Very true, although my blogging came to an abrupt halt after my third mobile post in May. Recently I've begun to miss the process of writing a post - but not necessarily the result!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "but not necessarily the result!"
      What's that about then, Sir?
      I miss your inciteful scribblings!
      :-)

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    2. Do you mean that you're never satisfied with the finished article, Gibson? If so, I wouldn't worry about it - I've never written one yet that I've been really happy with. Occasionally I go back and edit them after the event and, almost without exception, end up making them even more unsatisfactory.

      Yours are fine, by the way. Get the muse back; or is it the mojo? I'm never really sure.

      Delete
  7. Three very enjoyable posts there Alan. Number 4 needs to be titled 'People'.

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    Replies

    1. Thanks, James.
      :-)
      We met some very nice people on Wasdale Head NT camp site (and some absolute horrors) one or two interesting people in the pub and a nice couple at Burnmoor Tarn. That was about it, Sir. For an August break there were surprisingly few people about.

      I do agree though - one of the nicest things about walking and being outdoors is the wonderful people you bump into on your travels.

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  8. By God that looks awfully hilly. Don't "peak" too soon, Sir. 265 days. :-)

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    Replies
    1. 265 days sounds an awful lot, but 38 weeks not quite as long.
      As usual I will fritter away the time and be dreadfully unfit for the start day.
      It *was* awfully hilly up there, Sir. We loads and loads of the hilly devils.

      We just didn't climb too many of them...

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  9. Great set of pictures Alan that invoke some wonderful memories of runs, scrambles and climbs - not to mention an exciting experience I once had. I still get minor trembles when recalling a soloing of Napes Needle many years ago. It's amazing how I've lived to 82!
    Carry on scribbling....

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    Replies
    1. Well Gordon.
      I'm sure you'll have a lot more adventures to come!
      :-)

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  10. some fantastic pictures alan i,m convinced not that i really must get myself up to the lake district and do some walking up there .

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    Replies
    1. It's a wonderful spot, Chris - but it takes me all day to get there.
      So I needed to factor in two days travel for two days for walking - not a great return.

      Delete
  11. Hi Alan, I've just caught up with your postings and was pleased to see Darren make a brief (if slightly more portly than I remember) appearance. It sounds as if you had a nice relaxing holiday with him. Nice pics.
    Martin (and Sue says hello)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Martin and hello Sue!
      :-)
      Yes, Darren does seem to have put on a few pounds. He's been tied up massively with his job (which also precludes him from doing the TGO Challenge) but now he seems to have the backpacking bug again. Before the lakes he was out with Duncan in the Cairngorms, so his mojo is back again. I expect before too long the svelte Darren will be gracing our screens once again.
      :-)

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  12. Great stuff, I expect Darren feels nicely refreshed and ready for the new term...

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  13. Nice set of posts there depicting the essence of Wasdale. Slackpacking has become our usual regime lately, heat or not - don't knock it!.
    Wasdale itself was certainly a thrilling place when we first visited, the drive up it and the number of cars and people at its head... not so much.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Geoff!
      :-)
      I'm a natural slackpacker - I have to give myself little targets or my natural inclination is stay put and enjoy wherever I am for a couple of days.
      I think we were lucky with Wasdale Head as there was hardly anyone about, despite it being the summer holidays.

      Delete

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